May. 19th, 2010

zustifer: (skeleton: omg!)
To Catch a Thief (1955), Alfred Hitchcock. Apr 9, 9pm. View count: 1.5.
A Matter of Life and Death (1946), Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger. Apr 10, 9pm. View count: One.
True Stories (1986), David Byrne. Apr 17, 9pm. View count: 10?
Majo no takkyƻbin (AKA Kiki's Delivery Service, 1989), Hayao Miyazaki. Apr 21, 8:30pm. View count: One.
The Running Man (1987), Paul Michael Glaser. May 8, 10pm. View count: Two.
Theodore Rex (1995), Jonathan R. Betuel. May 13, 8:30pm. View count: 1.2.
Shield For Murder (1954), Howard W. Koch & Edmond O'Brien. May 15, 6:20pm. View count: One.
Dellamore Dellamorte (AKA Cemetery Man, 1994), Michele Soavi. May 16, 8pm. View count: Four?


To Catch a Thief is surprisingly dull for Hitchcock, all told. People seem to consider this worth seeing for Cary Grant, but I really don't think his acting is great enough to hang a whole picture on. Admittedly, I stopped paying close attention to this partway through.

Matter of Life and Death: This is a goony postwar take on wartime. A pilot bails out of his flaming plane sans-a-chute and somehow wakes up alive. This means that he must go on trial in heaven for the right to continue living (because he has fallen in love with a radio operator, don'tcha know). There are silly character actors in various period clothing, there's emergency brain surgery, and an elfin french guy who can stop time. These are probably the best things.
Having read up on this a bit, I found that this movie was made to reaffirm US/UK postwar relations, which I suppose were not at their best. This makes the very labored "He's an englishman! But he is IN LOVE! With an AMERICAN GIRL! From BOSTON!" plotline a lot less baffling.
Diverting at best, slightly embarrassing at worst.

True Stories was for probably fifteen years one of my top ten movies. Maybe it still is.

Kiki's Delivery Service I wasn't utterly thrilled by, but it's fairly charming. I somehow hadn't seen it before. I think my favorite part is the eurogibberish on the street signage.

Running Man is goofy as anything. My largest bone to pick with it is that the audience sympathy flip felt unwarranted, and I could have used more Network references.

Theodore Rex is absolutely awful. Don't watch it. It's not funny; it's just sad. I have a fair amount of evidence that it was trying to reference/rip off Blade Runner, which is a big problem when the final product is a straight-to-DVD horror with a lead actor who had to be enticed back to the production with more money. The puppets are by the same company that worked on the Dinosaurs television show, except somehow they are less enjoyable here. The plot feels like it was reworked a lot, never very well.

Shield For Murder is a fun little Bad Cop piece, with enough of a nuanced part for said Bad Cop that he doesn't feel entirely like a cardboard cutout. John Agar is in it! The best part is toward the end, in a bar. Fun.

Dellamore Dellamorte is another one of my old favorites. I thought it held up, and I maybe even looked a little more kindly on the ending, which historically I've hated a little. It's really well done, with the adorable filmic flair indicators that film students contractually have to love. It's also my first zombie movie.

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Karla Z

February 2012

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